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2 edition of Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul written to the Colossians found in the catalog.

Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul written to the Colossians

Thomas Cartwright

Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul written to the Colossians

by Thomas Cartwright

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Published by Nicol in Edinburgh .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bible. -- N.T. -- Colossians.

  • Edition Notes

    Bound with Airay, Henry. Lectures upon the whole Epistle of St. Paul to the Philippians. 1864.

    Statementpreached by Thomas Cartwright.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxviii, 68 p.
    Number of Pages68
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14819196M

    A commentary upon the epistle of St. Paul written to the Colossians by: Cartwright, Thomas, Published: () The Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon: a commentary on the Greek text / by: Dunn, James D. G., Published: ().   The Apostle Paul wrote his letter to the Philippians to thank them. They had sent him a financial gift through a man named Epaphroditus. Epaphroditus also went above and beyond to help Paul with his work (Philippians ). Additionally, the Philippian church supported Paul when he was imprisoned before (Acts 16). So part of the reason Paul.

    Get this from a library! A commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul written to the Colossians. [Thomas Cartwright]. Commentary upon the epistle of St. Paul written to the Colossians. Edinburgh: J. Nichol, (OCoLC) Print version: Cartwright, Thomas, Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul written to the Colossians. Edinburgh: J. Nichol, (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File.

    The Epistle to the Laodiceans is a lost (although witnessed in Codex Fuldensis) letter of Paul the Apostle, the original existence of which is inferred from an instruction to the congregation in Colossae to send their letter to the believing community in Laodicea, and likewise obtain a copy of the letter "from Laodicea" (Greek: ἐκ Λαοδικείας, ek Laodikeas).   The Epistle to the Colossians is one of the Prison Epistles which are so called because they were written by Paul while he was in prison in Rome. The Prison Epistles include Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and the very personal Epistle .


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Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul written to the Colossians by Thomas Cartwright Download PDF EPUB FB2

A commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul written to the Colossians (Nichol's series of commentaries) Unknown Binding – January 1, by Thomas Cartwright (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsAuthor: Thomas Cartwright. A Commentary on the Letter of Paul to the Colossians.

Pastor Galen L. Doughty Southside Christian Church September INTRODUCTION: This commentary is based upon my personal devotional notes and reflections on the. Letter of Paul to the Colossians.

It is intended to help you better understand some of the background and issues in Paul’s letter. THE EPISTLE OF PAUL THE APOSTLE TO THE COLOSSIANS Commentary by A. Faussett INTRODUCTION The GENUINENESS of this Epistle is attested by Justin Martyr [Dialogue with Trypho, p. B.], who quotes "the first-born of every creature," in reference to Christ, from Col A “Commentary on the Greek text of the Epistle of Paul to the Ephesians, ” by the Rev.

Eadie, is more exclusively addressed to Greek scholars, and enters more elaborately into philological researches, than any other Commentary that has been recently published in the English language.

It is the fruit of very extensive reading, not only in the Fathers, the. The natural conclusion would be that all these similarities were due to the same author writing and dispatching these Epistles at one and the same time.

But Holtzmann's explanation was quite different. He supposed that St. Paul wrote a short epistle to the Colossians. From the study of this epistle a later writer composed the Epistle to the Ephesians.

No passage of St. Paul's approaches so nearly the teaching of St. John's great Epistle as Colossians13, where "the inheritance in the light," "the dominion of the darkness," and the "translation" by "the Father" into "the kingdom of the Son of his love," appear in a combination intrinsically Pauline, and yet that sounds like an utterance.

The salutation by the hand of me Paul - Probably the rest of the Epistle was written by an amanuensis. As was his custom, Paul affixed his own hand to it in the form of a salutation; compare the 1 Corinthians note; 2 Thessalonians note.

Remember my bonds - Also evidently written by his own hand, to make the injunction more impressive; compare the notes. COLOSSIANS Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, and Timothy our brother, To the holy and faithful brothers in Christ at Colosse: Grace and peace to you from God our Father.

Since Paul's letter to the Colossians is considered a warning and corrective against a File Size: KB. These differences are thought to provide evidence of a significant span of time between the time the epistles were written and the writing of the book of Revelation. Some of the epistles are thought to have been written near the time of the early date suggested for the book of Revelation (e.g., A.D.

for 2 Timothy; for 2 Peter). In the first of a series of articles entitled “Studies in the Epistle to the Colossians” he wrote: “Without doubt Colossae was the least important church to which any epistle of St. Paul is addressed.” So wrote Bishop Lightfoot some years ago in one of the finest commentaries on New Testament literature.

THE EPISTLE TO THE COLOSSIANS Th1s Epistle to the Colossians was written probably to the smallest of the churches which Paul addressed. Colosse was not a great city, compared with Corinth or Rome or Ephesus; and yet, from this small city, there went out influences that were very important for the kingdom of God.

The Letter of Paul to the Colossians, also called The Epistle of St. Paul the Apostle to the Colossians, New Testament writing addressed to Christians at Colossae, Asia Minor, whose congregation was founded by Paul’s colleague Epaphras. The developed theology of the letter, many believe, indicates that it was composed by Paul in Rome about ad.

Paul wrote a hard-hitting letter in short, emotional sentences, directed at the false teachers. The central theme was the cosmic lordship of Jesus. This is known as Paul's letter to the Colossians. Apparently, soon after writing Colossians, with time on his hands in prison, he developed the themes in the letter we know as Ephesians.

THE LETTER TO THE COLOSSIANS. This letter is addressed to a congregation at Colossae in the Lycus Valley in Asia Minor, east of Ephesus. At the time of writing, Paul had not visited there, the letter says (Col ; ). The community had apparently been established by Epaphras of Colossae (Col ; ; Phlm 23).

Problems, however, had arisen, brought on by teachers. The Epistle of Paul to the Colossians, (or simply Colossians), is the twelfth book of the New Testament. It was written, according to the text, by Paul the Apostle and Timothy to the Church in Colossae, a small Phrygian city near Laodicea and approximately miles ( km) from Ephesus in Asia Minor.

Scholars have increasingly questioned Paul's authorship and. This letter challenges the believers in Colosse to look solely to the divinity of Jesus Christ, through whom we are all saved. In it, Paul refutes the gnostic heresy spreading throughout the Colossian church and presents Jesus as God, creator of the universe.

He emphasizes the importance of the cross: Jesus is Savior. 2 For more information on the epistle see Lightfoot’s very full discussion of it in his commentary on St.

Paul's Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon (London, ). Below I reproduce Lightfoot’s critical text of the Epistola ad Laodicenses. The parallel English translation is my own.

Dive deeper into Paul’s Greek with this commentary by J. Llewelyn Davies, complete with a translation and the Westcott-Hort text of Ephesians, Colossians, and Philemon. Davies focuses on reconstructing the historical occasions of the letters—as.

The letter to the Colossians is thus “Paul’s vigorous reaction to the news of the strange teaching which was being inculcated at Colossae” (F. Bruce); but as H. Chadwick has shown, Paul’s defense of the faith goes hand in hand with an apologetic statement of that faith to the intellectual world of his day (NTS, I [], ff.).

Containing 31 sermons, Cartwright’s commentary provides a thorough examination of this key New Testament epistle. Written nearly three hundred years before it was published, this collection of sermons presents the Epistle to the Colossians in a traditional Puritan sermon format.

This epistle, like that to the Romans, was written to those he had never seen, nor had any personal acquaintance with. The church planted at Colosse was not by Paul's ministry, but by the ministry of Epaphras or Epaphroditus, an evangelist, one whom he delegated to preach the gospel among the Gentiles; and yet, I.

Bound with Cartwright, Thomas. Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul to the Colossians. Pages: Book Overview - Colossians.

The City. It was situated about miles east of Ephesus, and was of little importance at the time of this epistle, though it had once been of considerable influence. It was one of a group of three cities, Laodicia and Hierapolis being the Other two, situated on the Lycus river near where it flows into.